COMMENT 
   VALID 00056 PAGES
C REC  PAGE   DESCRIPTION
C00001 00001
C00006 00002    
C00007 00003                            Output
C00010 00004    Now suppose we want the continued fraction of
C00012 00005                            Input
C00015 00006    From RIGHT TO LEFT across the page, we write the incoming terms as
C00017 00007                            Throughput
C00019 00008            . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1
C00022 00009    A more interesting case:  suppose we want the continued fraction for
C00024 00010    In fact we have proved a more general result.  We can replace 2k by
C00027 00011    as a composition of homographic functions:
C00030 00012            8   0
C00033 00013    This gives us
C00036 00014            Addition, Multiplication, etc. of Two Continued Fractions
C00039 00015    Floating below the surface of the page, directly beneath the bdac
C00041 00016            2xy + x           -2       sqrt(6)
C00043 00017       . . . 5   3   1
C00045 00018       . . . 5    3    1
C00047 00019       . . . 5    3    1
C00051 00020    Now we must input the 4 from the y sequence, whereupon we will get an
C00053 00021    Unfortunately, except for a few degenerate cases, each matrix variable
C00059 00022    (Problem:  how do you write an arbitrary arithmetic expression as
C00064 00023             .01070 - .02160 = -.01090
C00067 00024            Square Roots of Continued Fractions
C00069 00025    Since the output must equal the input, the next term of y must always
C00072 00026    Then [f(2)] = 2,
C00075 00027                    The Real Thing
C00089 00028    Guessing y = 69 will give us a value of -69, which, averaged with
C00092 00029       . . .  7    5    3    1
C00094 00030          . . .   9   7    5    3    1
C00096 00031            Square Roots etc. Using Feedback
C00100 00032    Then we can use the mechanism for simple arithmetic, starting with
C00103 00033    So 2 it is.  Again, outputing, inputing, and inputing:
C00105 00034                2   4   2   2
C00107 00035                    Non-regular Continued Fractions
C00109 00036    The differences between this algorithm and the one for regular
C00113 00037        . . .         100    81    64   49   36   25   16   9   4   1  (1)
C00115 00038                    Zero and Negative Terms
C00118 00039    This seemingly innocent fact explains why the addition of an initial
C00122 00040            Increasing the Convergence Rate of Continued Fractions
C00123 00041            Reexpressing Series as Continued Fractions
C00124 00042                    Conversion to Decimal
C00128 00043                    Conversion From Decimal
C00130 00044                    Conflicting Notations
C00131 00045                    Approximations
C00135 00046            Nx + n
C00138 00047                    Continued Logarithms
C00141 00048    so 100/2.54 = 111110110111010111000110101010 .  Alternatively, we could
C00144 00049    Another problem related to huge terms could be called the
C00148 00050    with continued logarithms.  For each x input of 1, y's value
C00150 00051    To illustrate the power and simplicity of this mechanism, we
C00153 00052    Here again y > 2, requiring another 1, but since b is odd, we must
C00155 00053                            The Continued Logarithm of pi etc.
C00156 00054                            Architecture
C00160 00055    The four main advantages of this scheme over the FFT schemes are:
C00163 00056    
C00164 ENDMK
C
;








                               Appendix 2


                      Continued Fraction Arithmetic


                                  by

                              Bill Gosper



Abstract:  Contrary to everybody, this self contained paper will show that
continued fractions are not only perfectly amenable to arithmetic, they are
amenable to perfect arithmetic.
                    Output

Suppose we want the continued fraction for an exact rational number,
say 2.54, the number of centimeters per inch.  We can execute
Euclid's algorithm neatly as follows:

254             Initially, 2.54 = 254/100
100     2       Short divide 100 into 254, getting 2, remainder 54
 54     1       54 into 100 goes once, remainder 46
 46     1       46 into 54
  8     5       8 into 46
  6     1
  2     3
  0             We incidentally have found that gcd(254,100) = 2.

This says that the continued fraction of 2.54 is 2 1 1 5 1 3, or

        2.54 = 2 + 1/(1 + 1/(1 + 1/(5 + 1/(1 + 1/3))))

                       1
             = 2 + ---------
                           1
                   1 + ---------
                               1
                       1 + ---------
                                   1
                           5 + --------
                                     1
                               1 +  ---
                                     3
Similarly, if you want 100/2.54, the number of inches per meter,
you will find

        39 2 1 2 2 1 4

which is much nicer than

        39.(370078740157480314960629921259842519685039)

where the part in parentheses repeats forever.  (Incidentally, this
repeating decimal is easily computed since the remainder of 2 after
the quotient digits 3937 ensures that, starting with 7874..., the
answer will be just twice the original one, ignoring the
decimal point.  Thus you just double the quotient, starting from the
left (using one digit lookahead for carries), placing the answer
digits on the right, so as to make the number chase its tail.  This
trick is even easier in expansions of ratios where some remainder
is exactly 1/nth of an earlier one, for small n. You forget about
the divisor and simply start shortdividing by n at the quotient
digit corresponding to the earlier remainder.  If this seems confusing,
forget it--it has nothing to do with continued fractions.)
Now suppose we want the continued fraction of

        70 t + 29
        --------- ,
        12 t + 5

knowing only that t is positive.  We can only give a partial answer--
if t happened to be irrational, for instance, the true answer would
go on forever.  We do know, however, that as t varies between oo and 0,

        70   70 t + 29   29
        -- < --------- < --
        12   12 t + 5    5

so the first term, at least, is 5.  Following the same procedure
for Euclid's algorithm:

70 t + 29

12 t + 5        5       ( 70 t + 29 - 5 (12 t + 5) = 10 t + 4 )

10 t + 4        1       (I.e. between 12/10 and 5/4)

 2 t + 1        4       (It could only be 5 if t were truly oo)

 2 t

All we can say about our next quotient is that it lies between
1 and oo.  But we have managed to reexpress

        70 t + 29              1
        ---------  as  5 + ---------
        12 t + 5                   1
                           1 + ---------
                                       1
                               4 + ---------
                                    2 t + 1
                                    -------
                                      2 t

and thereby determine the first three terms of the continued fraction.

If we knew that t > 1/2, we could get another term:

        2 t + 1          1
        -------  =  1 + --- .
          2 t           2 t

                    Input

Now, the opposite problem:  suppose you are receiving the terms
of a continued fraction 5 1 4 1 ... which may go on forever, or
possibly end with a symbolic expression.  We wish to reconstruct
the value as the terms come in, rather than awaiting an end which
may never come.

Let x symbolize the value of the "rest" of the continued fraction,
so that before we learn its first term, x stands for the whole
thing.  When we learn that the first term is 5,

                      1      5 x + 1
        x becomes 5 + -  or  ------- .
                      x         x

When the next term turns out to be 1,

                      1       5 x + 1         6 x + 5
        x becomes 1 + -  and  ------- becomes ------- .
                      x          x             x + 1

Then

                      1       6 x + 5           29 x + 6
        x becomes 4 + -  and  -------  becomes  -------- .
                      x        x + 1            5 x + 1

Then

                      1       29 x + 6           35 x + 29
        x becomes 1 + -  and  --------  becomes  --------- .
                      x       5 x + 1             6 x + 5

Finally, when x becomes 2 t, we have reconstructed the original
expression.

In general, when

                 1         q x + r           (a q + r) x + q
   x becomes a + - , then  -------  becomes  --------------- .
                 x         s x + t           (a s + t) x + s

Although this looks messy, it can be handled almost as neatly as
Euclid's algorithm:
From RIGHT TO LEFT across the page, we write the incoming terms as
we learn them:

                . . .   1   4   1   5

Under the first (rightmost) term, we place the left edge of the array

        1   0                1 x + 0
                symbolizing  -------  i.e. the identity function:
        0   1                0 x + 1


                . . .   1   4   1   5

                                    1   0

                                    0   1

Then, again from RIGHT TO LEFT, we extend the lower two rows with the
simple recurrence:  multiply each element by the term in the top row
above it, then add the element to the right and write the sum on the
left:

                . . .   1   4   1   5

                   35  29   6   5   1   0

                    6   5   1   1   0   1

That is, 29 = 4 * 6 + 5, and in the bottom row, 6 = 1 * 5 + 1.
Letting the last term be 2t,

                  2t   1   4   1   5
 
       70t + 29   35  29   6   5   1   0

       12t + 5     6   5   1   1   0   1

The great thing about this process is that you can take other
functions by initializing the rightmost matrix to other than

        1   0

        0   1 .

Furthermore, it is possible to intersperse steps of the Euclid
process between input steps, thereby computing the continued
fraction of the value of the function while the value
of the argument is still being learned.
                    Throughput

Suppose, for instance, that we want to compute the continued fraction

             2
for     -----------
        3 - sqrt(2)

knowing that the continued fraction for sqrt(2) is 1 2 2 2 2 2 ... .
We set up

        . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1

                                        0   2

                                       -1   3

symbolizing

        0 sqrt(2) + 2
        ------------- .
        - sqrt(2) + 3

Filling in two elements of each row:

        . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1

                                4   2   0   2

                                3   2  -1   3

        4   2         4 x + 2
But            means  -------  and since x, the rest of the continued
        3   2         3 x + 2

fraction, is between 0 and oo, we know that the answer is between
4/3 and 2/2, so we can perform a Euclid step with the quotient 1
as the first answer term:

        . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1

                                4   2   0   2

                                3   2  -1   3   1

                                1   0

(As before, we list the output terms down the right side.)
Now we must proceed to the left again (unless we are willing to admit
that we know x > 2):
    . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1

                                4   2   0   2

                            8   3   2  -1   3   1

                            2   1   0

Any number between 8/2 and 3/1 has 3 as its integer part,
so 3 is our second term.

        . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1

                                4   2   0   2

                            8   3   2  -1   3   1

                            2   1   0           3

                            2   0

Continuing:

        . . .   2   2   2   2   2   2   1

                                4   2   0   2

                            8   3   2  -1   3   1

                        5   2   1   0           3

                   10   4   2   0               1

                5   2   1   0                   4

           10   4   2   0                       1

            2   1   0                           4

But we have been in a loop since the second occurrence of the pattern

        2   1

        2   0

so we have found that the continued fraction for

             2
        -----------  is  1 3 1 4 1 4 1 4 . . .  .
        3 - sqrt(2)

A more interesting case:  suppose we want the continued fraction for

                1     e - 1
           tanh -  =  -----
                2     e + 1

and we know that e = 2.71828... = 2 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 6 1 1 8 1 ...,
which we can abbreviate 2 (1 2k+2 1).

        . . .   1   1   4   1   1   2   1   2

                                        1   1  -1

                                    4   3   1   1   0

                       12   7   5   2   1   1       2

           20  11   9   2   1   1   0   1           6

            2   1   1   0   1                      10

            0   1

Our suspicions aroused by the arithmetic progression developing in
the answer, and especially by the third occurrence of the pattern

        2   1

        0   1 ,

we introduce the symbolic term 2k+6


  . . .  1     1   2k+6   1   1   4   1   1   2   1   2

                                                  1   1  -1

                                              4   3   1   1   0

                                 12   7   5   2   1   1       2

                     20  11   9   2   1   1   0   1           6

8k+28  4k+15  4k+13   2   1   1   0   1                      10

  2      1      1     0   1                               4k+14

  0      1


The reoccurrence, independent of k, of the pattern

        2   1               e - 1
               proves that  -----  =  0 2 6 10 (4k+14)  =  0 (4k+2) .
        0   1               e + 1
In fact we have proved a more general result.  We can replace 2k by
f(k), an arbitrary positive integer-valued function, to get the
theorem:

        if  x = (f(k) 1 1)

then

        2 x + 1
        -------  =  2 x + 1  =  (2f(k)+2) .
        0 x + 1

A handy check on the arithmetic is provided by the fact that the
determinant of each of the 2 by 2 matrices is simply negated upon each
output and input. Thus, for example, the magnitude of these determinants
in the preceding example was always 2:

        (8k+12)*1 - (4k+7)*2  =  -2

           1 * 1  - (-1) * 1  =  2

Another source of redundancy is the possibility of postponing the
output (Euclid) steps for a while, then performing them in a long
burst, arriving at the same point in the array via a different
route.  The disadvantage of this scheme is that larger intermediate
numbers are generated.

Functions of the form

        p x + q
        ------- ,
        r x + s

which we have been abbreviating with the matrix

        p   q

        r   s

are known as homographic functions.  If f(x) and g(x) are two
such functions, the matrix for f(g(x)) is simply the product
of the matrices for f and g.  This can be verified directly by
substitution.  This means that we can regard a continued fraction

                                    1
        x  =  a b c ...  =  a + ---------
                                        1
                                b + ---------
                                            1
                                    c + ---------

                                            ...
as a composition of homographic functions:

         a   1   b   1   c   1
        (     ) (     ) (     )  . . .
         1   0   1   0   1   0

and a homographic function of such an x is merely

         p   q   a   1   b   1   c   1
        (     ) (     ) (     ) (     )  . . .
         r   s   1   0   1   0   1   0

Carrying out these multiplications from left to right will produce
the same sequence of matrices as successively inputing the terms
a, b, c, ... in our array process.  To output a term using matrices,
multiply on the left by the inverse of the matrix for inputing that
term.  Thus, our theorem that the function 2 x + 1 will remain
unchanged by inputing the sequence f 1 1 and then outputing the term
2f+2 can be written as the matrix identity

         0    1    2   1   f   1   1   1   1   1       2   1
        (       ) (     ) (     ) (     ) (     )  =  (     ) .
         1 -2f-2   0   1   1   0   1   0   1   0       0   1

Here is why we bother with these clumsy matrices:  we know that

        e + 1
        -----  =  2 6 10 14 ...
        e - 1

since deleting (or adding) an initial 0 term reciprocates the
value of a continued fraction.  We wish to use this result to
get the continued fraction for 4/e.  The problem is:  what is
the initial matrix?  Answer:

        0   4   1   1 -1      2  -2       4  -4
       (     ) (     )    =           ==
        1   0   1  -1        1/2 1/2      1   1

The left hand matrix says 4/x, the next one says

        x + 1
        ----- .
        x - 1

Inverting it says solve for x (in our case e).  (If function
composition comes from matrix multiplication, then function
inversion must come from matrix inversion.)   Multiplying by
the first matrix applies the "4 divided by" function.  Multiplying
all of the elements by 2 is just equivalent to multiplying the
numerator and denominator of a fraction.

The following computation of 4/e is much simpler if we squeeze out
additional terms from patterns like

        8   0

        3   1

by using the fact that x > 1, instead of the weaker condition x > 0,
so that we have

        8   8 x + 0   8+0              8   8 x + 0   0
        - > ------- > ---  instead of  - > ------- > - .
        3   3 x + 1   3+1              3   3 x + 1   1


  . . .   8k+26   8k+22  18  14  10   6   2

                                      4   4  -4
                                                        (Determinant = +or- 8)
                                 19   3   1   1   1

                             91   9   1   3       2

                             11   1   1           8
                             -------
                         43 | 3   1 |             3
                            |       |
                         26 | 2  -2 |             1
                             -------
                         17   1                   1

                          9   1                   1

                   144    8   0                   1

                    19    1   1                   7

                    11    1                       1

                     8    0                       1
                    --------
         24k+67    | 3    1 |                     2   (Pattern recurs,
                   |        |                          prompts input of
         16k+42    | 2   -2 |    period begins    1    symbolic terms.)
                    --------
          8k+25      1                            1

          8k+17      1                            1

64k+208     8        0                           k+2

 8k+27      1        1                            7

 8k+19      1                                     1

   8        0                                    k+2
  ------------
 | 3        1 |  Pattern recurs, period ends      2
 |            |
 | 2       -2 |
  ------------
This gives us

4
-  =  1  2  8  3  1  1  1  1  7  1  1  2 (1 1 1 k+2 7 1 k+2 2)
e

   =  1  2  8  3 (1  1  1 k+1 7  1 k+1 2) .

The reason for introducing the input term 8k+22 instead of 4k+22 is
that the matrix recurred only every other input term, thus apparently
regarding the input sequence to be (8k+2, 8k+6) instead of simply
(4k+2).  This is evidently related to the fact that this process
is characterized by a determinant of +or- 8.  A fun conjecture to
test would be the following generalization of Hurwitz's theorem:  The
homographic matrix is periodic iff the input sequence is periodic
modulo the determinant.

                Inverting Homographic Functions

A very useful trick to add to your high school algebra repertoire:

              a x + b            -d y + b
        y  =  -------  ->  x  =  --------  .
              c x + d             c y - a

That is, to invert a homographic function, just interchange and
negate the diagonal elements of its matrix.  This is a shortcut
equivalent to inverting the matrix, then multiplying all four
elements by minus the determinant.  Of course if the determinant,
ad - bc, is 0, then we can't solve for x because y is a constant
independent of x.
    Addition, Multiplication, etc. of Two Continued Fractions

                There is, however, another and yet more significant
                practical demand that the apparatus of continued
                fractions does not satisfy at all.  Knowing the
                representations of several numbers, we would like to be
                able, with relative ease, to find the representations
                of the simpler functions of these numbers (especially
                their sum and product).
                        ...

                On the other hand, for continued fractions there are
                no practically applicable rules for arithmetical
                operations;  even the problem of finding the continued
                fraction for a sum from the continued fractions
                representing the addends is exceedingly complicated,
                and unworkable in computational practice.

                        --A. YA. KHinchin, 1935

Until now, we have only taken functions of single continued
fractions, but to be really useful, our algorithm must extend to
arithmetic combinations of two continued fractions, x and y.  This we
do neatly by expanding to three dimensions.  We start with a 2 by 2 by
2 matrix of eight integers.  The position of each integer in the
matrix is determined by whether or not it is a coefficient of x,
whether or not it is a coefficient of y, and whether or not it is in
the numerator.  (The coefficients of xy are simultaneously
coefficients of x and of y.)  If we continue the convention of
writing the terms of x from right to left across the top of
the page, and write the terms of y down the right, where we used
to put the outputs, then we can put the 2 by 2 matrix corresponding
to the numerator expression where we used to put the initial
homographic function matrix.  That is, if

        x  =  x1  x2  x3 ...
        y  =  y1  y2  y3 ...

then we represent

        axy + bx + cy + d

by

        . . .  x3  x2  x1

                        b   d

                        a   c   y1

                                y2

                                .
                                .
                                .

Floating below the surface of the page, directly beneath the bdac
matrix, we can imagine the denominator matrix

                        f   h

                        e   g

representing

        exy + fx + gy + h .

Thus we can compute any expression of the form

        axy + bx + cy + d
        -----------------
        exy + fx + gy + h

by starting with the three dimensional matrix

        b   d
         f   h
        a   c
         e   g .

Let us call such expressions bihomographic.

The algorithms for continued fraction addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division are all identical but for the
initialization of the matrix!

                  1   0               1   0
        x + y  =   0   1    x - y  =   0   1
                  0   1               0  -1
                   0   0               0   0

                  0   0               1   0
        x * y  =   0   1    x / y  =   0   0
                  1   0               0   0
                   0   0               0   1

We shall work through a slightly fancier example function, for no
extra cost.  Using

        y  =  sqrt(6)  =  2 2 4 2 4 2 4 . . .

                           2
                          e  + 1
        x  =  coth 1   =  ------  =  1 3 5 7 9 . . .
                           2
                          e  - 1
we will compute
        2xy + x           -2       sqrt(6)
        -------  =  (1 + e  ) (1 + -------)
         xy + y                      12

which dictates the initial setup

   . . . 5   3   1   <- x
                          y
                 1   0    |
                  0   0   

                 2   0    2
                  1   1
                          2

                          4

Now as x and y independently vary from 0 to oo,

        axy + bx + cy + d
        -----------------
        exy + fx + gy + h

varies between limits among the ratios  a/e,  b/f,  c/g,  and  d/h,
provided that the denominator doesn't change sign.  For the matrix
in question, two of these denominators are zero, and they must be
shifted out of the picture by inputing a term of y.

   . . . 5   3   1

                 1   0
                  0   0

                 2   0    2
                  1   1

                 5   0    2
                  2   2

                          4


Here the 2 by 2 matrix  2   0  was multiplied by 2 (the first term of y)
                         1   1

and added to  1   0  to get  5   0  .  Now we observe that the lefthand
               0   0          2   2

pair of ratios, 2/1 and 5/2, have the same integer parts, whereas the
bottom pair, 5/2 and 0/2, do not.  Since our goal is to
get them to be equal so that we can perform a Euclid output step,
we proceed to the left with an x input.  Inputing from y instead
would not get rid of the 5/2 and 0/2 for another step.
   . . . 5   3   1

                 1   0
                  0   0

             2   2   0    2
              2   1   1

             5   5   0    2
              4   2   2

                          4


Unfortunately, this input of 1 still does not provide enough information to
determine the output (smaller terms are less informative than larger ones).
Nevertheless, the two new ratios, 2/2 and 5/4 have equal integer parts,
so we continue leftward.

   . . . 5   3   1

                 1   0
                  0   0

         8   2   2   0    2
          7   2   1   1

        20   5   5   0    2
         14   4   2   2

                          4


At last we have determined that the first answer term is 1, and we

                                         7   2
subtract 1 times the denominator matrix         from the numerator
                                        14   4

        8   2                                     1   0
matrix         to get the new denominator matrix        .
       20   5                                     6   1

   . . . 5    3    1
                                        outputs
                   1    0
                    0    0                 1

         8    2    2    0     2
          7    2    1    1
           1    0

        20    5    5    0     2
         14    4    2    2
           6    1

                              4


Again a 0 denominator thwarts immediate hope of another output, but
it is in the corner where either an x or a y input will get rid of it.
In fact, since the integer parts of the other three ratios are all
different, we will need at least two more input terms to get rid of
them.  We can further deduce that we need at least one y input,
otherwise the y-independent ratios will remain between 7 and oo,
while the other pair will stay in the disjoint interval between 14/6
and 4.  So let's sample y first.

   . . . 5    3    1
                                        outputs
                   1    0
                    0    0                 1

         8    2    2    0     2
          7    2    1    1
           1    0

        20    5    5    0     2
         14    4    2    2
           6    1

         35   10              4
          13    2

Now 14/6 and 35/13 have equal integer parts, so we move x-ward.

   . . . 5    3    1
                                        outputs
                   1    0
                    0    0                 1

         8    2    2    0     2
          7    2    1    1
           1    0

        20    5    5    0     2
    74   14    4    2    2
     31    6    1

   185   35   10              4
     67   13    2


which nets us an output term of 2.


   . . . 5    3    1
                                        outputs
                   1    0
                    0    0                 1
                                            2
         8    2    2    0     2
          7    2    1    1
           1    0

        20    5    5    0     2
    74   14    4    2    2
     31    6    1
      12    2

   185   35   10              4
     67   13    2
      51    9
Now we must input the 4 from the y sequence, whereupon we will get an
output of 1, leaving us with the matrix  51   9
                                          16   4

                                        216  38
                                          83  20 .

On the next page is a perspective view of the entire process up until
now.  The extremely elongated numbers are the inputs, and the three
outputs 1 2 1 are in the upper right.  This picture was produced with
Bruce Baumgart's Geometric Editor (Stanford AI Memo 232).

Another x and y go in and a 2, a 1, and a 1 bubble out:

. . .  7   5    3    1
                                          outputs
                     1    0
                      0    0                 1
                                              2
           8    2    2    0     2              1
            7    2    1    1                    2
             1    0                              1
                                                  1
          20    5    5    0     2                  .
      74   14    4    2    2                        .
       31    6    1                                  .
        12    2

     185   35   10              4
       67   13    2
 366    51    9
  116    16    4

      299   58                  2
1550   216   38
  601    83   20
   348    50                    .
    253    33
      95    17                  .

3466   483                      .
 1318   182
   830   119
    488    63
     342    56
Unfortunately, except for a few degenerate cases, each matrix variable
will tend to grow so as to contain about a quarter as many digits as
have been input.  However, there is no need for the most difficult
multiprecision routines--namely multiply and divide--since multiplies
will nearly always involve small terms, and divides are merely integer
estimates of ratios.  The rare case of a large term can be handled by
breaking it up, e.g. 78629 = 78000 0 629 .  (See the Zero and Negative
Terms section.) Also on the brighter side, the rate of information
output will keep up with the inputs except for a slight lag of a term or
two due to the crude bounds (0 to oo) used for the unread segments.

                But Why All This Trouble?

Why use algorithms that are at least twice as hard as the usual
algorithms on numbers in positional notation (e.g. decimal or
binary)?  One answer is that many numbers, such as pi and e, can be
represented exactly, using little programs (coroutines) to provide
indefinitely many continued fraction terms on demand. 

But the algorithms for sum, product, etc. of two such numbers have
this same property, for they produce their output as they read their
input.  Thus we can cascade several of these routines so as to
evaluate arithmetic expressions in such a way that output stream
begins almost immediately, and yet can continue almost indefinitely.
The user is freed from having to decide in advance just how much
precision is necessary and yet not wasteful.  Later we will extend this
claim to cover series terms and approximating iterations.

When you analyze why people actually bother with numerical
arithmetic instead of leaving things symbolic, you find that the
main reason is for deciding inequalities.  Imagine how much
computational effort has been wasted in generating the bits to the
right of the decisive ones in inequalities.  A fixed word length is
almost always too long, yet sometimes too short, whereas term-at-a-time
arithmetic can shut off as soon as the "comparands" differ.

Another great waste of effort is the generation of information which is
destroyed by truncation and rounding, or discarded in the form of
remainders from division.  By contrast, information is completely
conserved during continued fraction processes, making the arithmetic
reversible.  In fact, continued fraction arithmetic is information-driven:
processing is always directed to the subexpressions upon which the final
answer depends most.  No input is needlessly read, and no output is
needlessly delayed.  As a result, quantities which are multipled by small
coefficients or 0 will be evaluated only a little, or not at all.

The original arithmetic expression, whose value we seek to print out,
is expressed as a composition of homographic and bihomographic
functions.  (At the bottom level are the constants, which act like
functions of no arguments.)  These functions are the subexpressions
over which the computational effort is distributed.  When a function
is asked for a term, it performs the algorithm we have described in
the preceding pages, asking in turn for zero or more terms from its
subfunctions until its pending output term is insensitive to them.
If multiple processors are available, a fork can be executed whenever
a function finds itself dependent on more than one subfunction. 
(Problem:  how do you write an arbitrary arithmetic expression as
a minimal number of homographic and bihomographic functions?)

Contrary to convention, processing begins at the output routine.
The output routine asks the top level function for a datum
(term or digit) and the top level function inturn asks for
data from the input to which it is most sensitive.  Eventually,
a bottom level number routine will be reached, whereupon
information begins to percolate upward.

But most computations involve imprecise quantites, so why bother
with errorless arithmetic?  Because the built-in error analysis is
guaranteed to stop output before erroneous terms, simultaneously
indicating the quantity which limited the significance.  The trick is
to implement imprecise quantities as bottom level functions of no
arguments analogous to those for pi and e, but instead of containing
and endless description, these programs emit a loud croak when asked
for one more term than they have. 

A drawback of this scheme is that continued fraction terms are
inadequately small units of information, so that imprecise quantities
will usually have a fraction of a term left over, that is, a term
whose exact value is uncertain, but bounded more narrowly than
between 1 and oo.  Furthermore, most of the subexpression modules
will also contain partial terms when a computation stalls.  The best
solution to this problem is to use continued logarithms (later
section) instead of continued fractions, but we have a tolerable
solution which uses the reversiblity of continued fraction
computations.  The idea is for each imprecise quantity to describe
its upper bound, then take back a term or so and proceed to describe
its lower bound.  For example the gas constant

        PV
        --  =  R  =  8.31432 +or- .00034  Joules/deg/mole
        nT

could be converted to two continued fractions--one for the lower
limit of 8.31398, and one for the upper limit of 8.31466, but we
can effectively get both by running Euclid's algorithm on the lower
limit while keeping track of the error interval:

        8.31398 + .00068
        1.00000      0     8
         .31398 + .00068   3
         .05806 - .00184   5
         .02368 + .00988   2
         .01070 - .02160   2
         .00328 + .05308

In the fifth row a negative error has greater magnitude than the
corresponding remainder, indicating that we would be outputing
different terms by then if we were doing the upper limit instead.  But
we can switch over to doing the upper limit simply by adding the last
two errors to their corresponding remainders and then continuing:
         .01070 - .02160 = -.01090
         .00328 + .05308 =  .05636   0
                           -.01090  -6
                           -.00904

Note the 0 term, charateristic of retraction.

This tells us that the true value is between

        8 3 5 2 3

and     8 3 5 2 2 0 -6  =  8 3 5 2 -4  =  8 3 5 1 1 3

    =   8 3 5 2 3 0 -7

This means that we can describe our imprecise number as

        8 3 5 2 3 oo 0 -oo -7 oo

where oo means a very large term or, equivalently, a termination
signal.  The desired effect, anyway, is to squeeze out the partial
terms from the immediate superior function by making it think it has
gotten a lot of information.  Probably the best thing for f(x,y) to
do when it receives its first oo from an imprecise x is to set aside
copies of its coefficients of x, freeze y input (in case y might
deliver a confusing oo), read the rest of x (to the last oo), then
replace all of the noncoefficients of x with the copies of the
corresponding coefficients of x that had been set aside.
Unfortunately, when a function depends on two imprecise arguments,
it must go through extra pain to select the extremes from the four
values it achieves as each argument saturates at each limit. 

    Square Roots of Continued Fractions

To find y = sqrt(x), rewrite the equation as

        y  =  x/y .

Our plan is to extract a term at a time from the continued fraction
process for x/y subject to the condition that the output terms
of the process must equal the input terms of y.

We will be concerned with matrices whose last element is minus their
first.  This property is preserved if we always input what we output:

                   x

          ax+b     a   b

          cx-a     c  -a    x

              2
      b+2ax-cx   a-cx

Another important property of these matrices:  if

                 a y + b
        f(y)  =  -------
                 c y - a

and we wish to find the "fixed point" of f, i.e. solve the equation

        y  =  f(y) ,

then the simple iteration

        y  <-  average (y, f(y))

will be equivalent to the rapidly convergent Newton's iteration
for the equivalent equation

           2
        c y  - 2 a y - b  =  0 .

These particular homographic functions are the self-inverse ones,
that is, f(f(y)) = y for all y.

For a warmup exercise, we will assume x to be merely a rational, 17/10,
instead of a continued fraction.  We set up the matrix for

                 17
         f(y) = ----
                10 y

namely

                                        0   17

                                       10    0 .

Since the output must equal the input, the next term of y must always
be the integer part of the fixed point of the (homographic) function
defined by the matrix.  To find this we can run a miniature
successive approximation for each term.  For example, the arbitrary
guess that y = 3 gives f(y) = 17/30 , whose integer part is 0.  The
average of y and f(y), whose integer part is 1, will be much closer,
being equivalent to a step of Newton's method.  Now f(1) = 17/10, and
since the actual value always lies between y and f(y), 1 must be the
integer part of sqrt(17/10) and hence the first input and output
term.  Outputing and inputing a 1:

                                        1

                                        0   17

                                  10   10    0    1

                                   7  -10   17

The next term will be the integer part of the solution of

              10 y + 10
        y  =  --------- .
               7 y - 10

We could start by guessing y = 2.  Note that since we desire positive
terms, we must choose x > 10/7 to avoid the negative root.  [f(2)] = 4,
so we try the average, 3.  [f(3)] = 3, so we output and input 3:

                                   3    1

                                        0   17

                                  10   10    0    1

                             11    7  -10   17    3

                              7  -11   40

Here we find f(3) = 4, which is no problem, since the actual fixed
point is in between and thus must start with 3.

                              3    3    1

                                        0   17

                                  10   10    0    1

                             11    7  -10   17    3

                        10    7  -11   40         3

                        10  -10   40
Then [f(2)] = 2,

                         2    3    3    1

                                        0   17

                                  10   10    0    1

                             11    7  -10   17    3

                        10    7  -11   40         3

                   10   10  -10   40              2

                    7  -10   27

But we had this same matrix after the first term, so

        sqrt(17/10)  =  1 (3 3 2) .

(Actually, in this special case where the radicand is rational, it
is possible to eliminate the guesswork from each iteration by observing
that the determinant is preserved.  In general, when

              a y + b
        y  =  -------
              c y - a
        
we have the determinant

                 2
        D  =  - a  - b c

and

              a + sqrt(-D)
        y  =  ------------
                   c

so [y] is merely [(a+d)/c], where d = [sqrt(-D)], which we need only
compute once at the beginning.  The algorithm is then a close equivalent
to the one in Knuth, exercise 4.5.3.12.  Unfortunately, when the radicand
is a continued fraction to begin with, there is no such convenient
invariant, so we will need a small iteration for each term.)

            The Real Thing

Actually, we can solve any quadratic equation by rewriting it
as the fixed point of a self-inverse homographic function:

           2                             - q x - 2 r
        p x  + q x + r  =  0   ->  x  =  ----------- .
                                         2 p x  + q

So instead of simply taking the square root of a continued fraction,
it will be more illustrative to solve a quadratic equation, one of
whose coefficients is a continued fraction.  We will compute coth 1/2
from

        coth 1  =  1 3 5 ...  =  (2k+1)

using
                2
        (coth t)  + 1
        -------------  =  coth 2t
          2 coth t

with t = 1/2.

The equation we want is

              x y - 1
        y  =  -------
               y - x

where x = coth 1  and y = coth 1/2 , giving us the initial setup

   . . .  7    5    3    1

                         0   -1
                         -1    0

                         1    0
                          0    1

Corresponding to x = oo and x = 0 are the left and righthand 2 by 2
matrices, which, as functions of y, also have the useful property
of being self-inverse.  This means that we can use the Newton averaging
trick to quickly find the integer part of the fixed point of the left
matrix, and if it satisfies the righthand one, it is the term to
output in the answer and input as y.  If the two matrices have
different fixed points, more x input is needed.  This sounds harder
than it is.

Initially, the lefthand (x = oo) equation says

        y = - y .

Guessing y = 69 will give us a value of -69, which, averaged with
69 gives our second approximation, 0, which is exactly right, since
the equation happened to be degenerately linear.  The righthand
equation is

        y  =  - 1/y ,

which is decidedly not solved by y = 0, so, hardly to our surprise,
we must read in a term or more of x before we can begin to output
some algebraic function of it.

   . . .  7    5    3    1

                   -1    0   -1
                    -1   -1    0

                    1    1    0
                     1    0    1

The new lefthand function is truly pathological, being identically
1 except at 1, where it is 0/0.  Assuming that we make our algorithm
perform more input upon division by 0, two more inputs will occur.

   . . .  7    5    3    1

        -16   -3   -1    0   -1
         -21   -4   -1   -1    0

         21    4    1    1    0
          16    3    1    0    1

Finally, both of the last two matrices have fixed points solidly
between 2 and 3, so we output a 2 in the z direction and input a
2 in the y direction.

   . . .  7    5    3    1

        -16   -3   -1    0   -1
         -21   -4   -1   -1    0
           26    5

         21    4    1    1    0     2
          16    3    1    0    1
          -11   -2

          11    2
            4    1

Now the lefthand matrix has fixed point between 6 and 7, while 6
plugged into the righthand one gives 15/4.  More input.

   . . .  7    5    3    1

        -16   -3   -1    0   -1
         -21   -4   -1   -1    0
           26    5

         21    4    1    1    0     2
    115   16    3    1    0    1
     -79  -11   -2

     79   11    2
      29    4    1

Trying our 6 in the new lefthand matrix, we win.

   . . .  7    5    3    1

        -16   -3   -1    0   -1
         -21   -4   -1   -1    0
           26    5

         21    4    1    1    0     2
    115   16    3    1    0    1
     -79  -11   -2
      589   82

     79   11    2                   6
      29    4    1
      -95  -13

      95   13
       19    4

Now the lefthand matrix says 10, but not the right.  Inputing 9 from
x confirms the 10 for y.

      . . .   9   7    5    3    1

                -16   -3   -1    0   -1
                 -21   -4   -1   -1    0
                   26    5

                 21    4    1    1    0     2
            115   16    3    1    0    1
             -79  -11   -2
              589   82

             79   11    2                   6
        265   29    4    1
        -868  -95  -13
         8945  979

        868   95   13                      10
         175   19    4
         -882  -95

         882   95
          125   29

It is not obvious how to show the the answer will indeed be
2 6 10 14 ...  = (4k+2).

For a while, this computation will be typical in that the output rate
will about match the input rate, while the matrix integers slowly
grow, but in this peculiar case, the output terms outgrow the input
terms, so that input must occur somewhat oftener to make up the
information rate. 

Come to think of it, the schoolboy algorithm for square root is also
digit-at-a-time, but requires two inputs for each output to avoid
souring future outputs. 

    Square Roots etc. Using Feedback

Suppose that continued fraction arithmetic is being used in
a successive approximations process, and suppose further that
this process is converging at better than one term per iteration.
(Newton's method, for example, delivers exponentially more terms
each iteration.)  This means that the next approximation will
contain at least one more correct term than the current one,
independent of the erroneous terms which follow.  But a
continued fraction process will not request data of which it
is independent, and thus it will have already computed the
new, correct term by the time it reads the corresponding
incorrect term.  But then there is no need at all to read the
incorrect term, since the correct one is already available.
So once a process starts to converge, it can gobble its own
output in a feedback loop. (This idea is due to Rich Schroeppel.)
There is a minor catch in all of this:  in order to be able to output early,
the module which computes the approximating expression must "realize" that
all instances of the input approximation must vary from 0 to oo in unison.
Thus all instances of the approximation variable must be grouped into a
single expression which may be more complicated than the ones for simple
arithmetic.  Generalization of the algorithm to higher dimensions, in order
to accomodate additional variables or higher powers, is straightforward but
tedious.  Someday, I would like to spend some time contemplating the
consequences of more complicated feedback arrangements. 

                        Worked Example

To compute x = sqrt(y), Newton's method says

                2
               x  + y
        x  <-  ------
                2 x

where x is the approximating variable.  Unfortunately, if both
x and y are continued fractions, the general form of the expression
required will be

          2                 2
        ax y + bxy + cy + dx  + ex + f
        ------------------------------
          2                 2
        gx y + hxy + iy + jx  + kx + l

which involves twelve integer variables and four dimensions.
The feedback technique is more easily demonstrated if y is
simply an integer, like 6 for instance.

Then we can use the mechanism for simple arithmetic, starting with
the matrix

                        0    6
                         1    0

                        1    0
                         0    1

        x y + 6
i.e.    ------- , which, when y = x, is Newton's method for
         x + y

x = sqrt(6).  In the denominator, the choice of x + y
instead of 2x + 0y, for instance, will provide convenient symmetry
which will be preserved by the fact that both inputs (and the output)
will always be equal.

The four ratios amount to two 0s and two oos, indicating that we
will have to warm up the process before it produces terms automatically.
To get a term, we must estimate the integer part of the answer, which
we do simply by successive substitution using integer arithmetic.
Starting with a guess of 3, for instance:

        3*3 + 6           2*2 + 6
        -------  =  2+ ,  -------  =  2+
         3 + 3             2 + 2

so 2 is the first term, which we output and input for both x and y:

                . . .   2

                        0    6
                    2    1    0
                     2   -2    6

                        1    0      2
                    1    0    1
                     0    1   -2
                                    .
                    4    1          .
                     2    0         .

(We could have done this in any of the six possible orders.)
Again the ratios disagree, so we must take another guess and
resubstitute it until it stabilizes.  Among the four ratios,
0/1 is the limit when both inputs approach 0 (unrealisitic,
they are greater than 1), the two 1/0s are the limits when one
input approaches 0 while the other approaches oo (absurd, they
are equal), and the 4/2 is the limit when they both approach oo.
Since the curve is asymptotically flat, this last, lower left
ratio, when finite, is the best first guess:

           2
        4*2  + (1+1)*2 + 0
        ------------------  =  2+
           2
        2*2  + (0+0)*2 + 1

So 2 it is.  Again, outputing, inputing, and inputing:

           . . .    2   2

                        0    6
                    2    1    0
                     2   -2    6

                        1    0      2
                    1    0    1
                1    0    1   -2
                 0    1   -2

                    4    1          2
                4    2    0
                 1    0    1

                9    4
                 2    1

This time, 9/2 suggests 4, which is confirmed by 178/40 = 4+ , so

        . . .   4   2   2

                        0    6
                    2    1    0
                     2   -2    6

                        1    0      2
                    1    0    1
                1    0    1   -2
                 0    1   -2

                    4    1          2
                4    2    0
            4    1    0    1
             2    0    2

                9    4              4
            9    2    1
             4    1    0

           40    9
            18    4

Now we are cooking, since the three ratios, 40/18, 9/4, and 2/1, all say
that the next term is 2, and since everything is positive, the true
value must be between the greatest and least ratio.  Pumping through
this 2,
            2   4   2   2

                        0    6
                    2    1    0
                     2   -2    6

                        1    0      2
                    1    0    1
                1    0    1   -2
                 0    1   -2

                    4    1          2
                4    2    0
            4    1    0    1
             2    0    2

                9    4              4
            9    2    1
        9    4    1    0
         2    1    0

           40    9                  2
       40   18    4
         9    4    1
                                    .
       89   40                      .
        20    9                     .

We are now to the point of producing outputs twice as fast
as they are needed for input, so our matrix is getting overfed.
Let's drain it out without inputing to see what's left.

        40   18
          9    4
           4    2
            1    0
        
        89   40
         20    9
           9    4
            2    1

outputing a 4 and a 2.  But we had this matrix

        4    2
         1    0

        9    4
         2    1

before, right after processing the second term.  Since the matrix
alone determines its future inputs, a repetition immediately
implies a loop, proving

        sqrt(6)  =  2 2 (4 2 4 2)  =  2 (2 4) .

            Non-regular Continued Fractions

From the (non-regular) continued fraction for arctan 1,

       4              1
       --  =  1 + ---------
       pi                 4
                  3 + ---------
                              9
                      5 + ---------
                                  16
                          7 + ---------
                                        .
                                          .
                                            .

we can compute the regular continued fraction for pi:

    . . .         100    81    64   49   36   25   16   9   4   1  (1)
             21    19    17    15   13   11    9    7   5   3   1

                                                       12   4   0   4

                                                   24   4   1   1   0   3

                                                    4   0   1
                                                   -------
                                        555   51    6   1

                            16416 1044   79    7    1   0               7

                             1008   72    2    2
                             ----------
98692840 3891940 169621 8261  456   29

 6169520  243320  10598  518   28    2
 ---------------
 4934642  194597

  308476   12166                                                      15

  307502   12107                                                       1

     974      59

The differences between this algorithm and the one for regular
continued fractions (all 1s in the numerators):

        1.  The list of numerators is written down just above
            the denominator terms.
        2.  Each element is computed from the two to its right
            by multiplying the nearer one by the denominator term
            above it, in the next to top line--then multiplying the
            further (rightmost) element by the numerator term above
            it (in the top line)--then finally adding the two
            products.  (When the numerators are all 1, this 
            is the same as the regular algorithm.)
            Thus, in the pi conversion, 555 = 9*51 + 16*6.
        3.  The determinant is not preserved, and it is possible
            for a 2 by 2 pattern to have a gcd of
            all four elements greater than 1.  This gcd will always
            divide the last numerator used.  In the pi conversion,
            this gcd exceeded 1 three times, successively reaching
            4, 36, and 20.  In an effort to keep the elements small,
            these gcds were divided out each time.  The reducible
            matrices were underlined and the reduced ones were then
            copied directly beneath.
        4.  You soon need scratch paper or a calculator.

The output steps are the same as for Euclid's algorithm.

The regular continued fraction for pi is particularly hard to get out of
any process, due to the difficulty in deciding whether the third
term is going to be 15 or 16.  (The value of pi with its first two terms
gone is 15.997... .)  These problems are due to the particularly large
term which will follow the 1--we can already tell it will be around
300 from looking at the last matrix.  This is also what makes

                                355
        3 7 15 1  =  3 7 16  =  ---  =  3.1415929...
                                113

such a good approximation to pi.

A partial remedy to this "constipation" problem is simply to guess
what a pending output term will be, relying on the process to correct
itself later.  The corrections, if necessary, will take the form of
negative terms and possibly 0.  These can be "cleaned up" by running
the regular Euclidean process starting with the identity function.
In the case of the pi conversion, the pattern

        8261  456

         518   28

tells us that the next term is between 15.9 and 16.3 so we could
(incorrectly) guess that the next term was 16:

    . . .         100    81    64   49   36   25   16   9   4   1  (1)
             21    19    17    15   13   11    9    7   5   3   1

                                                       12   4   0   4

                                                   24   4   1   1   0   3

                                                    4   0   1
                                                   -------
                                        555   51    6   1

                            16416 1044   79    7    1   0               7

                             1008   72    2    2
                             ----------
                        8261  456   29

 6169520  243320  10598  518   28    2                                16

   -1948   -1180     53  -27    8
  --------------
  308476   12166

    -974     -59

Although this gets us an earlier output, the next three input terms
still fail to get us that big term near 300--not until the ingestion
of the pair
                196
           29
                do we get our desired -294.  After that, five more
inputs yield the three small outputs 3, -4, 5.  (Small terms contain
less information and therefore come out quicker.)  This data is based
on the assumption of an output whenever the nearest integers to both
the upper and lower limits are equal.

            Zero and Negative Terms

Converting the preceding result to all-positive form, we use the identity
function:

    . . .   5     -4    3  -294  16   7   3

                                 22   3   1   0

                            113   7   1   0   1   3

              -14093  -4703  16   1   0           7

                -881   -294   1   0              15

                -878   -293                       1

                  -3     -1                     292

       33   7     -2     -1                       1

       19   4     -1      0                       1

       14   3                                     1

        5   1                                     2

        4   1                                     1

        1   0

which is correct as far as it goes.  The careful reader may wonder
at the seemingly premature input of the term 5 to the matrix

        7   -2     7 y - 2
                =  -------
        4   -1     4 y - 1

which seems to say "between 7/4 and 2", thus foreordaining an output
of 1.  Beware denominator elements of opposite sign!  y between 0
and oo actually says "OUTSIDE 7/4 and 2", with a singularity at
y = 1/4.  y must be outside 0 and 1/3 to assure an output of 1
(as was the case).

This raises the question of just what are reasonable assumptions
about the range of y when we are dealing with an admittedly messed up
continued fraction.  The answer is that there are none, at least
without some very special preprocessing of the input sequence.  

The problem is mainly with 0.  The sequence  ... a 0 b ...
is equivalent to the single term  ... a+b ..., since if
p and q were any adjacent elements of an input process,

 . . .   a+b  . . .              . . .  b    0   a   . . .
                       ==
(a+b)p+q  p   q               (a+b)p+q  p  ap+q  p   q

i.e. the last two adjacent elements are in the same state either way.
This seemingly innocent fact explains why the addition of an initial
0 term is equivalent to the deletion (when possible) of one:

  0 0 x . . .   =  0+x . . .  =  x . . .

It also partly explains the funny preambles on certain "linear
Hurwitz" numbers:

        e  =  2 (1 2k+2 1)  =  1 0 1 (1 2k+2 1)  =  (1 2k 1)

        4
        -  =  1 2 8 3 (1 1 1 k+1 7 1 k+1 2)
        e

           =  1 2 1 0 7 1 0 2 (1 1 1 k+1 7 1 k+1 2)

           =  1 2 (1 k 7 1 k 2 1 1) .

      17
 sqrt(--)  =  1 (3 3 2)  =  (1 3 3 1 0)
      10

(Hurwitz numbers are those which can be written in this parenthesis
notation using polynomials in k.  Hurwitz's theorem states that this
property is preserved by homographic functions with rational
coefficients.  Square roots of rationals are all of the form

        a (b c ... c b 2a)  =  (a b c ... c b a 0) .

More on this later.)

The mischief comes with sequences like

  . . . 1 2 3 4 5 0 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 . . .   =   . . . 0 . . .

wherein it seems to be saying something and then takes it all back.
This allows a peculiar but complete reversibility of continued
fraction computations--by merely inputing or outputing 0 and then
several negated terms in reverse order, the computation can back
up to any previous state, but unless the maximum length of these
"retraction palindromes" can be bounded in advance, there is
no reliable way to collapse them out with a sequential process.
Even further confusion can be introduced with several applications
of the rule:

        -a -b -c -d ...  =  -a-1 1 b-1 c d ...

In practical situations, however, you really can avoid these
problems, and the only other nonsense sequence to watch out for is

        . . . -1  1 -1  1 -1  1  . . .

But these can be detected when they begin, whereupon you can shut
of output until they stop.  You can also simply discard three pairs
at a time, since the only effect is to negate the whole state matrix:

        . . .   1   -1   1  -1   1   -1  . . .

           -p  -q  q-p  -p   q  q-p   p  q   .
    Increasing the Convergence Rate of Continued Fractions
    Reexpressing Series as Continued Fractions

R notation
            Conversion to Decimal

                     . . .    1  15   7   3

                                 22   3   1   0

                                  7   1   0   1   3
                                 ******
                            150  10   0

                            106   7   1           1
                            *******
                            440  30

                            106   7               4
                            *******
                       180  160  20

                       113  106   7               1
                       ********
                       670  540

                       113  106

That is, just follow the recipe for the homographic function of one argument,
except on output, you multiply by 10 after the subtraction, instead of
reciprocating.  On paper, this necessitates recopying the denominators, which
resembles the outputing of 0.  Thus, a decimal fraction can be thought of as
a continued fraction with two terms for every digit.   The denominators are
the decimal digits alternated with 0s, while the numerators are alternately 1
and 10.  On output, the gcd of the matrix can be multiplied by a divisor of 10.
This can be detected simply by maintaining modulo 10 versions of the two
denominator coefficients.  In the special case that the input continued fraction
is regular (as above), only a finite number of such reductions can occur,
corresponding to the total number of factors of 2 and 5 that the initial
denominator coefficients shared in common.  Thus, although there is little
reduction to be gained in the regular case, there is also little effort--
you need only count the 2s and 5s in the gcd of the initial denominator
terms, and cancel out at most one of each with each output multiplier of 10.

A curiosity worth noting is that when this decimal (or especially octal)
conversion is performed on the nonregular fraction for arctan 1 (as in
the section on nonregular fractions), the number of reductions by 2
depends drastically upon the original denominator coefficients.
If they are 0 and 1, for instance, there will be four times as many cancellable
powers of 2 than if they are 1 and 0.  Thus, by this method, 1/pi is significantly
easier to calculate than pi.  This fact may be connected with the observation
that infinite series for 1/pi seem to be simpler and more rapidly convergent
than series for pi.

            Conversion From Decimal

is immediate, since, for instance

                                    1
     pi  =  3.141592...  =  3 + ---------
                                       10
                                0 + ---------
                                            1
                                    1 + ---------
                                               10
                                        0 + ---------
                                                    1
                                            4 + ---------
                   1                                   10
         = 3 + ----------                       0 + ---------
                      1000                                  1
               0 + ----------                       1 + ---------
                            1                                  10
                  141 + ----------                      0 + ---------
                                1000                                1
                        592 + ---------                     5 + ---------
                                                                       10
                                    . . .                       0 + ---------
                                                                            1
                                                                    9 + ---------

                                                                           . . .


and we already know how to deal with non-regular continued fractions.
            Conflicting Notations

oo
matrices
left to right.


            Approximations

Comparison rule:  If we call the integer part of a continued fraction the 0th
term, then we can say that the a (regular) continued fraction is an increasing
function of its even numbered terms, and a decreasing function of its odd
numbered terms.  Thus, to compare two continued fractions, compare the terms
at the first position where they differ, then reverse the decision if this
position is odd numbered.  If one continued fraction terminates before
differeing from the other, regard the shorter one to be suffixed by an
infinite term.

The comparison rule can also follow from the rule for subtracting two
continued fractions with zero or more initial terms in common.  If

        w  =  a b c ... p x
and
        y  =  a b c ... p z ,

where x and z are the tails of the two fractions, then

              Nx + n             Nz + n           N   n
        w  =  ------  and  y  =  ------ ,  where         is the
              Dx + d             Dz + d           D   d

matrix resulting from the input of a b c ... p  to the identity matrix

                1   0

                0   1 .
Then
                      u (x - z)
       w - y  =   -----------------
                  (Dx + d) (Dz + d)

where u is the determinant Nd - nD  =  1 or -1 respective of whether
there was an even or odd number of inputs to th matrix.  Note that this
expression is independent of N and n, so we need only compute the bottom
row of the matrix.  But the bottom row is what you would get by dropping
the original input term, the computing the top row.  We thus save another
step.  (If two continued fractions start with the same term, it is clear
that their difference is independent of the value of that term.)

Simplest intervening rational:  In a recent popularity poll, parents
were asked what they thought of the idea of teaching schoolchildren
continued fractions instead of long division.  Sixty nine percent of those
responding though it was a communist plot.  What is the smallest number
of people who could have been polled?

Presumably, by 69% the pollsters didn't mean exactly 69 of every 100
but rather some fraction p/q which is at least .685 but less than .695.
Our problem is to find in the half-open interval [.685, .695) the
rational with smallest q.  (A half-open interval contains its left
endpoint but not its right one.)

If p/q and r/s are distinct nonnegative rationals in lowest terms, we will
say that p/q is simpler than r/s if p<=r and q<=s.  It may be that of p/q and
r/s, neither is simpler than the other.  In this case, however, there is
always some rational numerically between them which is simpler than either.
(E.g., 11/8 is between and simpler than 11/10 and 13/8.  11/8 is the minimum
of the numerators over the minimum of the denominators.)  It follows that
there is a simplest rational in every finite interval, since there can only
be a finite number, pq, of rationals simpler than any rational
p/q.  If our intervals can include oo, we shall treat it as if it were 1/0,
thus defining oo to be simpler than any rational besides 0 (i.e., 0/1).  The
motivation for this is related to oo having the empty continued fraction.
Now we have defined the simplest rational in any interval with nonnegative
endpoints which does not include both 0 and oo.  We leave it to the
philosophers to determine which of these two numbers is simplest.

The pollster problem now becomes:  what is the denominator of the simplest
rational in [.685, .695) ?  This is easy to solve if we first determine that
the continued fractions of the two endpoints are

        .685  =  0 1 2 3+
and
        .695  =  0 1 2 5+

through the first term where they differ.  By 3+ we mean some number greater
than 3 but less than 4, and similarly for 5+.  From this comparison rule, all
of the numbers in the interval have continued fractions  =  0 1 2 x, where x
is in the interval (3+, 5+], what ever those two numbers happen to be.  The
simplest number in this interval is 4.  The simplest rational in [.685, .695)
is therefore the number whose continued fraction is

        0 1 2 4  = 9/13  .(692307)

so as few as 13 people may have been polled, provided that they all
responded.  This rationale is amplified on the page after next.

(I can't resist pointing out that dividing 13 into 9 is a great example of
the tail chasing trick mentioned on page 1:  after producing the digits 6 and
9, the remainder is 3, which is 1/3 of the initial "remainder" (namely, the
dividend) 9.  This means that we can compute the rest of the quotient digits
230769... simply by dividing 3 into 692307... .)

Of course, since we really only wanted the denominator 13, we could have
skipped the computation of the numerator 9:

             4   2   1   0
       13    3   1   1   0   1 ,

(relying on the input process to produce lowest terms.)  But then if we
wanted to check the answer, we would have to multiply 13 by .69 and see
if the result was very near an integer.

The computation of two nearby continued fractions can be streamlined
considerably, if we do not wish to go much beyond where they disagree.
Begin an ordinary Euclid output process on one number (for variety, we
choose the larger), while keeping track of the separation interval, as
we did with the gas constant.  For .695/1 and .685/1,

        .695  -.010
       1.000   .000   0
        .695  -.010   1
        .305  +.010   2
        .085  -.030   3
        .050  +.100

stopping when the magnitude of the interval width exceeds the last remainder.
At this stage, the last term would have been different, had we used the
other endpoint.  But we can easily switch over to computing the other
endpoint by adding in the interval widths on whichever two consecutive
lines we wish:

        .695  -.010
       1.000   .000   0
        .695  -.010   1
        .305  +.010   2   .315
        .085  -.030   3   .055  5
        .050  +.100       .040

Since both contnued fractions were infinished when we stopped them,
we have shown, with very little manipulative effort, that

        .695  =  0 1 2 3+
and
        .685  =  0 1 2 5+

as required.

Fact (theorem):  If A and B are positive rationals, with A simpler than B,
then C + 1/A is simpler than C + 1/B, where C is a nonnegative integer.

But C + 1/A and C + 1/B are what you get by prefixing the term C to the
continued fractions for A and B.  This means that in determining which
of two (terminating) continued fractions represents the simpler rational,
we can ignore any initial sequence of terms that they have in common.  The
continued fraction of the simplest rational included in an interval consists
of this common initial term sequence, to which is appended the continued
fraction of the simplest rational in the interval determined by erasing the
common initial sequence from the original endpoints.

We characterize an interval as a pair of endpoints in [0, oo].  Associated
with each endpoint is a flag saying whether or not the endpoint is included
in the interval.  When we modify the continued fraction of an endpoint to
produce a new endpoint, we will be careful not to modify this flag.

Recipe #1 for the simplest included rational:  Write as continued fractions the
two endpoints of the interval in question, stopping at least one term beyond the
one where they first disagree, except that if one of them terminates before
disagreeing, suffix to it a term of oo.  Set aside whatever initial sequence of
terms they have in common.  These terms will be the initial ones of the simplest
included rational, as well as all of the other numbers in the interval.  Now we
need only find the simplest rational in an interval whose endpoints have
continued fractions which start with different terms.  (If we have set aside all
of the terms of one endpoint, we are left with an explicit oo.)  The only way
this new interval can fail to contain oo or at least one integer is if the upper
endpoint is itself an exact integer, but is excluded by virtue of being the tail
of an endpoint which was excluded in the original problem.  It must also be the
case that the lower endpoint has an initial term 1 less than the upper one.  The
easiest thing to do in this case is to rewrite the single term which is the upper
endpoint as the previous integer followed by a 1, e.g., 3 1 instead of 4.  Then we
again have two continued fractions which start with the same term, and can
proceed with the recipe.

Recipe #2 for simplest included rational:  If the interval contains oo,
return the answer oo.  IF the interval contains any integers, return the
smallest one.  Otherwise let g be the greatest integer in the smaller
endpoint.  Return g + the reciprocal of the simplest rational in the
inttefval determined by reciprocating the fraction parts of the original
endpoints.

The reason Recipe #2 sounds easier is that it avoids the question of how
to do the arithmetic.  When it comes down to doing the work, Recipe #1
will save you plenty.

Here is an example which illustrates the tricky points.  A sportscaster
remarks that Joe diMolisho batted over .312 last year.  Unfortunately, the
sportscaster is notoriously pro diMolisho, so you can bet theat if Joe
batted as much as .3125, his friend in the booth would have said "Joe
batted .313 last year".  At least we know Joe saw a fair amount of action,
by determining the simplest rational in the open interval (.312, .3125)
(both endpoints excluded):

         .3120  +.0005
        1.000    .0000  0
         .3120  +.0005  3
         .0640  -.0015  4
         .0560  +.0065  1   .0625
         .0080  -.0080  7   .0000  oo
         .0000  +.0625

thus establishing that

        .312   =  0 3 4 1 7
and
        .3125  =  0 3 4 1 oo  =  0 3 5 .

Notice that our streamlined algorithm conveniently produced the continued
fraction for .3125 in just the (nonstandard) form we needed for the
recipe.  We have only to find the simplest rational in (7, oo), which is
8 because the oo is not in the interval.  So, dMolisho's simplest
possible performance ratio is

        0 3 4 1 8  = 44/141  =  .312051...

indicating at least 141 at bats.

Rounding rule:  When you discard the tail of a continued fraction, you
effectively subtract from the last term retained the reciprocal of the quantity 
represented by the tail.  This reciprocal is greater than 1/2 iff the first
term of the tail is 1, indicating that the last retained term should be
incremeted just when the first discarded term is 1.  Another way to look
at it is that a final 1 can always be combined into the preceding term,
so why truncate just before a 1 when truncating just after it will give a
more accurate estimate with the same number of terms?

Best truncations:  Whether or not you round, a truncated continued fraction
has the property of being the closest rational approximation to the
untruncated number, subject to having such a small numerator.  (No simpler
rational comes as close.)  The only other rationals with this property can all be
formed by reducing the last term of the truncated fraction by up to 50%.
For example, after 355/113, what is the next better rational
approximation to pi?

           pi   = 3 7 15 1 292 1 1 1 2 1 . . .
and
        355/113 = 3 7 15 1

so 103993/33102 = 3 7 15 1 292  is better than 355/113 (and by the rounding
rule, 104348/33215 = 3 7 15 1 293  is better still), but are there any
approximations of intermediate accuracy and simplicity?  Indeed, reducing the
terminal 292 to any integer greater than 292/2 = 146 will produce
intermediate approximations, while the approximation
51808/16491 = 3 7 15 1 145  is actually worse than 355/113.  To test
the borderline case of 52141/16604 = 3 7 15 1 146, we perform the following
simple but mysterious ritual:  write pi as

        3 7 15 1 146 0 146 1 1 2 1 . . .  .

Then, delete the first term and fold the left-hand portion over the 0:

        146 1 15 7
        146 1  1 1 2 1 . . .  .

Because the upper continued fraction numerically exceeds the lower one
(by the comparison rule), 52163/16604 = 3 7 15 1 146 is the next better
approximation to pi after 355/113 (!)  The improvement, however, is
microscopic:  less than 2 parts in a billion.

Mathematical explanation:  suppose we wish to truncate

  z  =  a  a  ... a  a    a    ...
         0  1      i  i+1  i+2

by discarding the terms beginning with term i+2.  How far can we reduce term
i+1 before it would be better to simply discard it too?  Define

  N
  -  =  a  a  ... a           x  =  a    a    ...
  D      0  1      i                 i+1  i+2

  n
  -  =  a  a  ... a
  d      0  1      i-1

  Nd - Dn  =  u  (u = +or- 1)

Then
        Nx + n
  z  =  ------
        Dx + d

   N  n       a   1   a   1       a   1
  (    )  =  ( 0   ) ( 1   ) ... ( i   )
   D  d       1   0   1   0       1   0

Transposing both sides,

   N  D       a   1       a   1   a   1
  (    )  =  ( i   ) ... ( 1   ) ( 0   )
   n  d       1   0       1   0   1   0

implying

  D
  -  =  a  ... a  a
  d      i      2  1

The error introduced by replacing the tail x by the single term p is

   Nx + n     Np + n         u (x - p)
   ------  -  ------   =  ----------------
   Dx + d     Dp + d      (Dx + d)(Dp + d)

while the error introduced by simply discarding the tail is

   N     Nx + n         u
   -  -  ------  =  ----------
   D     Dx + d     D (Dx + d)

The crossover point is when these two errors are equal, i.e., when

       d
   p + -  =  x - p
       D

or

   p a  ... a  a   =  (a   -p)  a    ...
      i      0  1       i+1      i+2

so if we think of this truncation as chopping off the continued fraction "in
the middle of a term", we have the following peculiar yet simple rule:
to test whether our chop has produced the best rational approximation possible
with such a small numerator, reverse the sequence of terms that we kept, and
discard what was originally the zeroth term.  Compare this, as a continued
fraction, with the part we chopped off (x-p).  If the part we chopped off
is greater than or equal to the reversed part, we would have done better
to chop off the whole term.
            Continued Logarithms

There is a mutation of continued fractions, which I call continued
logarithms, which have several advantages over regular continued
fractions, especially for computational hardware.  As with ordinary
continued fractions, each number and subexpression will be a
microprocess which describes itself a little at a time, but
instead of continued fraction terms, our description language will
have only two words, "0" and "1".  A 1 means "I was at least 2, so
I halved myself".  A 0 means "I was between 1 and 2, so I subtracted
1 and reciprocated myself (so now I am > 1)".
For example, we compute the continued logarithm of 100/2.54 :

11111   100/2.54  ->  50/2.54  ->  25/2.54  ->  25/5.08  ->  25/10.16  ->  25/20.32

0       25/20.32 - 1  =  4.68/20.32

11      20.32/4.68  ->  10.16/4.68  ->  5.08/4.68

0       5.08/4.68 - 1  =  .40/4.68

111     4.68/.40  ->  2.34/.40  ->  1.17/.40  ->  1.17/.80

0       1.17/.80 - 1  =  .37/.80

1       .80/.37  ->  .40/.37

0       .40/.37 - 1  =  .03/.37

111     .37/.03  ->  .37/.06  ->  .37/.12  ->  .37/.24

0       .37/.24 - 1  =  .13/.24

0       .24/.13 - 1  =  .11/.13

0       .13/.11 - 1  =  .02/.11

11      .11/.02  ->  .11/.04  ->  .11/.08

0       .11/.08 - 1  =  .03/.08

1       .08/.03  ->  .04/.03
         
0       .04/.03 - 1  =  .01/.03

1       .03/.01  ->  .03/.02

0       .03/.02 - 1 =  .01/.02

1       .02/.01  ->  .01/.01

0       .01/.01 - 1  =  0

        oo
so 100/2.54 = 111110110111010111000110101010 .  Alternatively, we could
write it as the sequence of lengths of bursts of 1s:  5,2,3,1,3,0,0,2,1,1,1.
In the latter representation, each term is the integer part of the log
base 2 of the number remaining to be described.  As with regular
continued fractions, oo is the empty sequence, rationals are the finite
sequences, and many (but not all!) quadratic surds have periodic
sequences.  Unlike regular continued fractions, integers can have
long sequences, and Hurwitz numbers seem patternless.  The direct
expression of a continued logarithm as a nonregular continued fraction:

                     5
100         5       2
----   =   2   + ---------
2.54                      2
                  2      2
                 2  + ---------
                               3
                       3      2
                      2  + ---------

                                .
                                 .
                                  .

                                        1
                               1       2
                              2  + ---------
                                        1
                                       2   .

That is, each denominator and succeeding numerator must be equal
powers of 2.

                Why Use Continued Logarithms?

The primary advantage is the conveniently small information parcel.
The restriction to integers of regular continued fractions makes
them unsuitable for very large and very small numbers.  The
continued fraction for Avogadro's number, for example, cannot
even be determined to one term, since its integer part contains
23 digits, only 6 of which are known.  Also, mechanisms for
handling such gigantic terms would have to be built, only to
lie dormant throughout most computations, since huge terms are
very rare except at the beginning of huge numbers.  By contrast,
the continued logarithm of Avogadro's number begins with its binary
order of magnitude, and only then begins the description equivalent to
the leading digits--a sort of recursive version of scientific notation.
Another problem related to huge terms could be called the
.999... problem.  Suppose you were using continued fraction
arithmetic to multiply sqrt(2)  =  1 2 2 2 ... by sqrt(2),
but without any assurance that the two numbers are, in fact,
identical.  This means that at any time one of the input terms
might turn out to be something other than 2.  Depending upon
whether this occurs on an even or odd term, the numerical value
of the product will be 2.0000+ or 1.9999+, or, as continued
fractions

        2  ...
or      1 1  ...

But until that deviation occurs (maybe never), the first term
of the continued fraction is in doubt.  A partial solution to
this problem is to forcibly egest a 2 when it becomes clear
that this module is unduly stuck.  If we are wrong, the gigantic
term will simply come out negative.  What we would like to
say now is "regard my next term as infinite until further
notice", hoping that we are indeed through.  But this is not
enough for the functions which depend on our output, to
which they will eventually become extremely sensitive.  They
will need to know "just how close to infinity are you?", but
we, faced with an ever growing number with oscillating sign,
have no way to answer.  We do not even know when we should
input more 2s (at least we hope they are 2s).  The information-
drivenness has broken down.

With continued logarithms, there is no problem at all, if we regard a
1 to mean "my MAGNITUDE was at least 2, so I halved myself".  Our
function will simply produce 1s as long as the input patterns hold,
and a constant stream of 1s is at least as informative to a superior
function as any other string.  Simply stated, continued logarithms
allow us to say that the first digit of infinity is 1.  A slight
embarrassment could occur if it turned out that one of the inputs was
really < sqrt(2), since we have not included in our language a
mechanism for negative numbers (in this case it would serve as an
expletive).  We will see to this later. 

                The Simple Details

Suppose you are given the integers a, b, c, and d, and wish to
compute the homographic function

              a x + b
        y  =  -------
              c x + d
with continued logarithms.  For each x input of 1, y's value
must be preserved by doubling a and c, or if possible, halving
b and d.  This is because x has halved itself.  When x announces
that it has reduced itself by 1, add a to b and c to d.  When
x announces it has reciprocated itself, interchange a with b
and c with d.  Equally easy is output of y.  The knowledge that
x is > 1 gives us

                   a + b       a
        y between  -----  and  - ,
                   c + d       c

provided c+d and d have the same sign.  If both of these quantities
are >= 2, y can emit a 1 and halve itself by doubling c and d, or
if possible, halving a and b.  If the two ratios lie between 1 and
2, y decrements itself by subtracting c from a and d form b, then
reciprocates itself by interchanging a with c and b with d and
finally announces all this by emitting a 0.

Although these operations are not as nice on paper, they are
beautifully suited to binary machines, requiring only shift,
add, subtract, exchange, and compare-for-greater.
To illustrate the power and simplicity of this mechanism, we
will compute the continued log of sqrt(6) from first principles,
by solving

            6
        y = - .
            y

Setting up the matrix for 6/y,

                                0   6

                                1   0

we test whether y is greater or less than 2 by plugging in y = 2
to get 3.  The fact that the value went up instead of down says
that y > 2, since by Newton's method, the average is closer than
either.  So we outpulse and receive a 1, meaning to halve a and b,
then double a and c.

                                0   3

                                2   0    1

Now plugging in y = 2 gives 3/4, so y < 2 and we oupulse and receive
a 0, which is just like outputing and inputing a term of 1 with
regular continued fractions.  (In fact the golden ratio, whose
continued fraction is all 1s, has continued log all 0s.)

                                0   3

                            2   2   0    10

                            1  -2   3

Here the assumption y >= 2 fulfills itself, while 1 <= y < 2 will
drive

        2 y + 2
        -------
         y - 2

negative.  So again we emit and receive a 1 by halving a and b, then
doubling a and c.

                                0   3

                            2   1   0    10

                            2  -2   3    1
Here again y > 2, requiring another 1, but since b is odd, we must
double c and d, then also double a and c.

                                0   3

                            4   1   0    10

                            8  -4   3    11

Here y < 2, ending another 1 burst.

                                0   3

                            4   1   0    10

                        4   8  -4   3    110

                        1  -4   5

Here y must be > 2 (in fact > 4) to avoid chasing the negative root,
and this time we can process the 1 by halving a and b, then halving
b and d.

                                0   3

                            4   1   0    10

                        2   2  -4   3    110

                        1  -2   5        1

But the matrix was in this state right after emitting the first 0,
so

        sqrt(6) = 10(1101) .

In computational practice, we will need two other words besides 1
and 0 in the language.  For negative numbers we could have either
"-" for "I negated myself" or "+" for "I incremented myself".  For
fractions initially < 1, "*" would mean "I doubled myself", the
opposite of "1".  Also, for finite inputs, we formally require
an end-of-string mark, which is logically oo, since the empty
continued logarithm, like the empty continued fraction, represents
+or- oo.  Continued logs can also represent oo as an endless burst
of 1s, if it results from nonterminating inputs.
                    The Continued Logarithm of pi etc.
                    Architecture

If it is possible to make very long parallel adders, it should be possible to
make a high-precision, ultrahigh speed arithmetic processor based on
continued logarithms.  It would be an extremely parallel device consisting
entirely of registers and having no static memory.  Such an architecture is
feasible because, within a given bihomographic octet of registers, each bit
must connect to only five others.  Here is why. 

Schematically, we can think of our 2 by 2 by 2 matrix as a cube with a
register at each vertex.  Into this cube flow the two bit streams describing
the operands x and y, and out of it flows the bit stream of the answer, z.
No matter which of the three possible transactions we perform, the additions,
subtractions, comparisons, and exchanges take place between registers joined by
the edges of this cube.  In fact, we could imagine that within each edge was the
control logic for the transaction determined by that edge's direction.  Thus
each register bit need only talk to its three counterparts in the x, y, and z
directions, plus its left and right neighbors (for shifting and carrying). 

Instead of wasting time testing which of the three possible transactions is
most relevant, we will synchronously and cyclicly input x, input y, and
output z on each major cycle.  This will simplify the hardware at the cost of
diluting the information density of the output stream by a small percentage,
due to the occasional retraction of a premature output.  Sadly, this will
also cripple our automatic error analysis, but such is the price of speed.
We could gain even more speed by making output decisons before the carries
have settled, since this should introduce only slight further dilution. 

After our octet has received about 2n inputs and produced about n outputs,
each of our registers will contain about n/4 significant bits.  Carry times
will grow as log n, so our quotient or product or whatever will have taken
time proportional to n log n, like the FFT algorithms, but with a far
smaller constant of proportionality.
The four main advantages of this scheme over the FFT schemes are:

1) Simplicity--it is hardly more than a "smart memory", with a minimal form
of processor distributed throughout. 

2) Speed--we beat the traditional cost factor of dozens or even hundreds for
multiprecision, with output bits typically separated by only slightly more
than an integer add time.  With all of the internal thrashing, it may waste
energy, but not time. 

3) Consequently, the crossover point is toward much smaller numbers, thus
encompassing more applications. 

4) Additional parallelism--we can interconnect networks of these octets which
evaluate whole arithmetic expressions in parallel.  In fancy models, we could
imagine "octet pools" containing allocatable segments of register octets, to
be dynamically distributed as register contents grew and shrank.  Fancy or
not, it should be possible to sustain ultraprecise computations to megabit
accuracy, at megabit/second rates, using something not much more complicated
than a large semiconductor memory.  More conventional processors can not come
anywhere near sustaining such an ouput rate since most of their bits are
lying dormant in storage for relatively long periods.  Even Illiac IV using
FFT multiplication can only provide pi in megabit quantities at about 5
kilobits/sec, and only then with prodigious programming effort. 

The key idea is that with every bit of storage there be the associated logic
to operate on that bit.  The continued logarithm formulation restricts the
number of data paths to a conceivably practical level. 

term coalescence
clog:  Cd
rs feedback
outervals, terminations, oo (notation sec?)
bgcd, 2adic clog vocab
3Dify clog example?
fibonacci hurwitz
Ricatti
Integral formula, intricate limit for hurwitz